Ready To Quit Your Job? Follow These 5 Rules Before Taking The Leap


Difficulty in waking up every morning.

Weekdays look all blue, except for Fridays.

Apathy towards deadlines.

Constant feeling of ‘I have no idea what I’m doing’ all day long.


 ‘How do I quit my job’ syndrome.

In 2013, Gallup published a report on State of The Global Workplace and revealed some staggering data. Only 13% of the global workforce is actively engaged in their jobs, while 63% are not engaged, and 24% actively disengaged. Things are even worse in South Asia. Only 10% of our workforce is actively engaged in this region, while a whole one-third is actively disengaged.

You can causally brush aside these stats if you are among those blessed 13% that have found meaning to their jobs. But what if you’re of the sullen majority? What if you are at a dead end job and constantly feeling the urge to quit? What if ‘How do I quit my job’ appears on your Google search result every other week?

With mounting EMIs and backbreaking inflation, quitting is never an easy decision. But there are people around the world who gathered up their courage, sent in their resignation letters and set out to do something they really care about. For inspiration, read this and this story of people who took the plunge and quit their jobs to follow their passion. If you want to join their league and get a life where weekdays won’t depress you anymore, then follow these rules before you quit your job for something better.


Image source -
Image source –

Start planning early

In literal sense, all you need to do to quit your job is just – resign. But that’s not enough. What if you resign out of desperation with no other job offer or no savings to sail in different direction? It’s terrifying. Don’t think about the consequences after submitting the resignation letter. Start early. To find a better job in the same field, start communicating with your network in advance and nurture new connections. Get an offer in hand and then quit the current job. To start a new venture on your own, start looking out for partners and work on the finance and business plan. Get the base of your startup ready and then quit the current job. To travel the world and look for a new meaning in life, save money, clear all the loans and cut back on luxuries you can live without. Get your travel sheet ready and then quit.


Discuss plans with your A-team

Before talking to your boss, discuss your plans with the A-team – the group of people closest to you. Quitting a secure job to and moving towards uncertainty would require a lot of support than you can imagine. “Go for it. I believe in you” is the push you will need to take right steps ahead.


Don’t burn bridges

One of the most crucial points to remember at this point is to NEVER end things on a bitter note at your current workplace. Inform your boss early about your decision and cooperate with them to find a replacement for you. Don’t spread detestation about your job among your colleagues. Your job may have really upset you but once you decide to resign, don’t hold grudges and talk positive. Hate the game, not the players.


Be extra efficient before final ‘Good bye’

End things on a good note. Sure the job has sucked up all your zeal to change the world in past, but once you know your exit date, don’t sit back and relax. Be extra efficient and finish all the pending jobs.



Nobody deserves to stick at a job they hate. But you did and found a way out. That’s impressive. The time between when you decided to resign and your last day at work, is the toughest. There were piles of confusion, anxiety, uncertainty and long sleepless nights. Once it’s all over and you are ready to the things you love, you have to celebrate. Make plans with your A-team and spend time with yourself. Do something special and feel happy, because now it’s time to ‘clear browsing data’ from your computer.



(Recommended Reads:)

13 Classic Signs It’s Time to Quit Your Job

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